Features

Clearfix
Wed
07
Jul
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HDD versus SSD: Which is Best

GROUND zero in this debate is cost. Storage costs a lot – upwards of 40 per cent of the total cost of system ownership when it comes to video surveillance solutions. And current numbers indicate that SSD costs three times as much as HDD. The upshot of this is that it would be quite possible to install an SSD system that cost as much your HDD-supported entire solution. Yikes.

Of course, SSDs have good points. Because they don’t have the actuator arm to read the platter that’s at the heart of an HDD, they read and write to disk faster. This is a big advantage – especially if you were installing big megapixel cameras and money was no object.

If your surveillance application demands a lot of read and storage and you only have a small storage volume demand there’s no doubt whatever that going SSD will give you a very noticeable performance boost – especially if you are storing at HD resolution (720p) or higher.

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Thu
10
Jun
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Video Surveillance Storage Solutions

OVER the past 10 years or so the financial burden of digital storage on the overall surveillance spend has increased exponentially while at the same time vastly increasing the usefulness of CCTV systems as investigative tools.

In more recent times improvements in compression and analytics and falls in the price of storage are all contributing to a reduction in costs on the one hand while a shift to HD and megapixel cameras makes greater demands on the other.

According to Milestone’s Angelo Salvatore, solutions he is involved with show that while costs are falling users seem to want longer retention times.

“While compression is improving and storage costs are dropping customers are demanding longer retention periods which is directly affecting the cost of storage as part of the overall solution,” Salvatore explains.

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Mon
22
Feb
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Managing disparate networks

MANY organisations in today’s economy see a merger or acquisition as an attractive business strategy to improve financial position and weather a down market. This is especially true in the financial services sector, where even very large organisations are being acquired by equally large organisations as a basic survival strategy. While the results may favour shareholder value and workforce efficiency, the impact of combining the IT infrastructure and IT management processes of two entities can be profound.

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Sun
14
Feb
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Video Trends Unfold at IP Forum

In his keynote, Charles Foley urged the industry to accelerate the push toward IP-based surveillance. Foley, chairman and CEO of TimeSight Systems, urged the industry to embrace IP-based technology rather than relying on the “dead horse wisdom” of analog or strict recurring monthly revenue (RMR) models. Foley identified technological trends such as moving a physical security network to an IP backbone, addressing data storage challenges, thinking about video as data, integrating video into larger systems such as access control or IT networks, and implementing cloud-based storage. Sales growth of IP-based equipment is exceeding 15 percent, according to IMS Research statistics quoted by Foley. He also emphasized the importance of working well with IT managers who are now involved in 60 percent of security purchasing decisions.

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Mon
11
Jan
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Making connections

WHEN electronic security installers get involved in networked security solutions they’re going to find themselves facing a host of connectivity devices, the most common of which are repeaters, especially if the network is employing Cat-5 to get around a relatively large multi-story facility.

Repeaters are essential if a larger network is going to operate effectively. These devices connect different sections of the cable plant, receiving the signal and pumping it back up to full strength to combat attenuation caused by cable impedance. This done, the signal is then sent on its way. Think of repeaters as existing in the physical layer of a network where they support network media comprising the cable plant.

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Wed
10
Jun
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Securing wireless networks

BEFORE we get into this one, it’s worth recapping the sorts of wireless networks integrators and security managers are going to find themselves involved with. The most common RF designations include:

* 802.11: Applies to wireless LANs and provides 1 or 2 Mbps transmission in the 2.4 GHz band using either frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) or direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS).

* 802.11a: An extension to 802.11 that applies to wireless LANs and provides up to 54 Mbps in the 5GHz band. 802.11a uses an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing encoding scheme called COFDM, rather than FHSS or DSSS.

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Wed
03
Jun
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High performance

VIDEO surveillance is in the midst of a revolution that will change the nature of CCTV. But while there’s a lot of talk about the technology and its benefits, it’s not always easy to pin down the facts. What percentage of systems installed are IP and which standards will prevail in the world of networked video? And just what are the keys to high performance?

More than that – just what is an IP camera? Is it a CMOS-based IP camera delivering 4CIF of H264 compressed video? Is it a CMOS HD camera working at 1020p? Is it a CMOS-based megapixel camera delivering a potential image of 16 Megapixels? Or a 3-sensor CMOS Megapixel camera giving an atmospheric view? Is an IP camera only a full digital camera or is it a network-enabled analog camera with an onboard encoder? Not surprisingly, the answers depend on who you talk to.

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Tue
10
Mar
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Voices in your head

YOUR customers go with VoIP because it’s inexpensive – very inexpensive compared to standard phone calls. Trouble is, sharing a space with VoIP can be a challenge for many alarm systems. The last thing you want is to install a solution that keeps dragging you half-way across town for constant tweaking.

VoIP is essentially a process where a phone is connected to the Internet via a VoIP adapter in the same way any computer gets connected. This adaptor imitates the way a switched phone line functions but uses the Internet as the calling path rather than the phone line itself. It’s confusing in a way because all this is going on across the same piece of copper. The key is to think of these different paths as being different frequencies on the same physical copper line, with each frequency having a different bandwidth and being modulated onto a different voltage.

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Tue
10
Mar
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Building a Cat-7 network

IF you need to handle video surveillance, video conferencing and VoIP without going to fibre the most practical and appropriate cabling solution is a Class F copper cabling solution. This sort of network meet all demands of a hungry network while providing the lowest risk for the customer and you as the installation company.

Class F cabling technology is capable of supporting all the known networking protocols including the forthcoming 10 gigabit Ethernet. A solid option would be the AMP NETCONNECT shielded twisted pair ACO solution. This Class F installation is a shielded balanced pair cabling system that is slowly gaining acceptance in the Australian market place as a future-proofed copper cabling solution.

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Tue
10
Mar
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Understanding H.264 video compression

SO what is H.264 and what are the advantages and disadvantages of this new compression technology? Essentially, H.264 is a new video compression scheme which is set to become the worldwide digital video standard for consumer electronics and personal computers. H.264 has already been selected as a key compression scheme (codec) for the new optical disc formats, such as Blu-ray disc.

The intent of the H.264 standard project was to create a standard capable of providing good video quality at substantially lower bit rates than previous standards (e.g. half or less the bit rate of MPEG-2, H.263, or MPEG-4 Part 2), without increasing the complexity of design so much that it would be impractical or excessively expensive to implement.

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