Features

Clearfix
Sat
14
Aug
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Get Smart

It’s feared that smart crooks could uncover details of a smart card from the signals emanating from a reader. Hitachi worked with Technische Universitaet Darmstadt to develop the technology and company says it plans to bring the cards to market within 3 years. The technology could be ideal for protecting next generation multi applications credit and access cards.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Private Contractors Back

According to Blank, the TSA might let airports that hire their own screeners to employ them for tasks unrelated to security during off-peak hours. The importance of this is that is would make more economic sense for airports that have heavy morning and evening traffic with lulls in between. Meanwhile, subcommittee chairman Trent Lott, R-Miss., has told congress that while the TSA had done a good job, private companies would be more efficient and less expensive. The TSA was put together after 9-11 and up till now has employed and trained around 55,000 security screeners for airports across the U.S. These screeners have long been criticised as too expensive and no better than the private operators of the past. Studies (that have themselves been criticised) have shown that the private contractors are as effective as TSA screeners.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Billions Needed

According to the PTA, more than 16 times as many people use public transport like buses, ferries and trains, compared with domestic air travel. PTA president William Millar says that transit organisations have spent around $US1.7 billion on raising security levels but government funding for more surveillance cameras at stations, improved comms paths and better training are required to get the job done. Meanwhile, the Transportation Security Administration will start screening train passengers using X-ray machines, sniffer dogs and explosive detection equipment at Washington Station this month. The idea is hat screeners will run baggage through an X-ray machine while passengers will go through an explosives detection portal. It’s not the first time airport-style security has been implemented at a railway station. In May a suburban station in Maryland was one of the most secure in the world as a pilot for the Washington Station roll-out went through its paces.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Tyco Steps Into Future Power

"We are excited to be working with Plug Power, a leading-edge provider of new technologies targeted at the telecommunications industry," said Terrence Cummings, vice president and general manager, Tyco Electronic Installation Services. "This relationship will enhance the growth opportunities available to us in providing installation, engineering and maintenance services to the backup power market." Tyco Electronics Installation Services has a nationwide footprint covered by more than 300 qualified technicians who will be available to install and service the GenCore product line. Plug Power has already trained a number of Tyco technicians to operate, install and maintain Plug Power GenCore systems. Tyco is incorporating GenCore-specific training into the basic curriculum available to its service force.

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Sat
14
Aug
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London's Ring Of Steel

According to London’s Observer newpaper, the plan stems from the fear that the area around Big Ben and Parliament are vulnerable to attacks from truck bombs. Since a rash of IRA bombings 10 years ago led to street closures, and congestion led to a charge on private vehicles, London’s City business district has been significantly reduced.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Burn The Bomb

It’s a departure from the usual technique where holes are made in the casing of bombs and then try to use a number of methods to force the explosive out of the casing. The challenge with the forcing process is that it invariably causes some vibration that can lead to an explosion. SAI’s method means there’s no need to approach an explosive device. As part of the patent Applications, SAI showed steel cylinders being lowered over an anti-tank mine and the cavity filled with missile fuel and an oxidant. Once the mixture was ignited and burned for a length of time the mine was rendered safe.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Asis Getting Taken Seriously

ASIS will provide Ridge's department with access to more than 27,000 security professionals in the U.S., many of them responsible for protecting life and property in private corporations and other institutions that are parts of our national critical infrastructures. This fully operational, cross-agency, cross-sector, cross-discipline program is based on a system developed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), another partner in the venture. It is being deployed in four pilot communities. Dallas and Seattle are the first; Indianapolis and Atlanta will follow in August and September, respectively. ASIS members will not only participate in information exchange with federal authorities; some will be named to "governance boards" overseeing the system's operations regionally and locally.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Meet The Challenge, Says Australian Pm

According to Mr. Howard, ASIO now has greater funding that any time since the Cold War and has doubled in size, while $A872 million has been allocated to improving intelligence. Mr Howard called on private industry to continue spending on improvements in security, saying there was a cost everyone must share in the fight against terrorism. “There is a cost for all of us – there is a cost for you – involved in taking counter terrorism and security measures,” said Mr Howard. “Collectively we do pay a heavy price in economic terms but over…the price that we do pay…has to be put the…disruption and dislocation to our economy…that would occur if a terrorist attack took place in this country. “It is a challenge to our society, it’s a challenge we haven’t had before – we must simultaneously not become obsessed with it but equally take all the precautions that are necessary.”

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Sat
14
Aug
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FCC Wants Input On VOIP

Like DSL and cell phone switching, VoIP may have compatibility issues with many alarm monitoring systems. Steve Baker, president of the National Alarm Computer Center says the disruption of signals created by new protocols is a real problem for central stations and if not dealt with will cost them customers. “Undefined signals are the biggest liability to us,” Baker explained to SSN. “Dealers need to be more proactive.” The Alarm Industry Communications Committee (AICC), which includes members from multiple security industry associations, including the CSAA is pushing fo regulations from the FCC to control the effect of VoIP on alarm services. At the same time, the FCC has asked industry for a description of the threat VoIP poses to alarm monitoring services.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Panasonic Emphasises Move To Digital Video, Security Integration

“Digital One is a progressive new approach to video security and surveillance systems operation that embodies both existing analog systems products and new digital IP-based systems products,” Panasonic Vice President Frank Abram said in a statement. “It is an all-encompassing philosophy toward product development and systems integration.” Another Digital One goal is to provide end users with cost-efficient ways to upgrade their systems. The initiative is an outgrowth of Panasonic’s Networking Initiative that works to extend the scope of networked devices to include existing analog-based systems.

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