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Clearfix
Fri
20
Aug
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Great Strides In Millimetres

Not limited to metal, MMW-based systems can detect the possession of ceramic weapons, plastic explosives, drugs, and other contraband. L-3 Security & Detection Systems has embarked on an aggressive program to develop and commercialize an advanced MMW imaging portal for use indoors for airport security screening. It is based on proven missile seeker automatic target recognition technology used by the U.S. military over the last 20 years. The L-3 MMW passenger screening portal is expected to enter into trial testing at a major international airport near the end of 2004. In addition, the company is continuing to deploy its recently released Multi-View Tomography (MVT) X-ray technology for screening checked baggage. L-3's MVT is the next generation of Automated Technology (AT), the current standard for explosives detection at airports throughout Europe and Asia Pacific.

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Fri
20
Aug
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Bad News On The Horizon

The big challenge for emergency services teams was trying to ensure victims were reached without compromising their own safety and in the end the task was too difficult. In the aftermath, West Midlands chief inspector Surjeet Manku, said there was a need to assess: “Why decontamination took so long, whether decisions were rationally made and whether there were any communication difficulties.” Meanwhile detective chief constable Chris Sims, who oversaw Horizon said: “We have got to minimise the time it takes to get this full canopy of resources deployed, and I am sure we will be talking about that…There is a real balance to be struck. It is not just protecting ourselves, it's about serving casualties." In order to simulate reality, emergency services crews had no idea exactly when the attack would come and that made marshalling forces more difficult. It was a full 15 minutes before police threw a protective cordon around the NEC.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Team Studies Terrorism's Impact On Supply Chain

Supply chains can be thrown into disarray for many reasons. A severe storm can delay urgently needed raw materials. A major dock strike can halt the movement of goods. Then there are low-probability, high-impact incidents such as an earthquake or terrorist attack. Companies can learn to cope with crises like these and minimize the disruption to their businesses. “Often the issue is cultural—making sure that damage control is built into the very fabric of the organization," said Yossi Sheffi, professor of civil and environmental engineering and engineering systems and leader of the project. For example, a few years ago the production of computer chips was halted by a fire at a large supplier. One major customer, cell phone manufacturer Nokia, reacted quickly and found alternative sources of the chips. A competitor was much slower to react and eventually exited the cell phone business.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Panasonic Emphasises Move To Digital Video, Security Integration

“Digital One is a progressive new approach to video security and surveillance systems operation that embodies both existing analog systems products and new digital IP-based systems products,” Panasonic Vice President Frank Abram said in a statement. “It is an all-encompassing philosophy toward product development and systems integration.” Another Digital One goal is to provide end users with cost-efficient ways to upgrade their systems. The initiative is an outgrowth of Panasonic’s Networking Initiative that works to extend the scope of networked devices to include existing analog-based systems.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Meet The Challenge, Says Australian Pm

According to Mr. Howard, ASIO now has greater funding that any time since the Cold War and has doubled in size, while $A872 million has been allocated to improving intelligence. Mr Howard called on private industry to continue spending on improvements in security, saying there was a cost everyone must share in the fight against terrorism. “There is a cost for all of us – there is a cost for you – involved in taking counter terrorism and security measures,” said Mr Howard. “Collectively we do pay a heavy price in economic terms but over…the price that we do pay…has to be put the…disruption and dislocation to our economy…that would occur if a terrorist attack took place in this country. “It is a challenge to our society, it’s a challenge we haven’t had before – we must simultaneously not become obsessed with it but equally take all the precautions that are necessary.”

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Sat
14
Aug
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Asis Getting Taken Seriously

ASIS will provide Ridge's department with access to more than 27,000 security professionals in the U.S., many of them responsible for protecting life and property in private corporations and other institutions that are parts of our national critical infrastructures. This fully operational, cross-agency, cross-sector, cross-discipline program is based on a system developed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), another partner in the venture. It is being deployed in four pilot communities. Dallas and Seattle are the first; Indianapolis and Atlanta will follow in August and September, respectively. ASIS members will not only participate in information exchange with federal authorities; some will be named to "governance boards" overseeing the system's operations regionally and locally.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Burn The Bomb

It’s a departure from the usual technique where holes are made in the casing of bombs and then try to use a number of methods to force the explosive out of the casing. The challenge with the forcing process is that it invariably causes some vibration that can lead to an explosion. SAI’s method means there’s no need to approach an explosive device. As part of the patent Applications, SAI showed steel cylinders being lowered over an anti-tank mine and the cavity filled with missile fuel and an oxidant. Once the mixture was ignited and burned for a length of time the mine was rendered safe.

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Sat
14
Aug
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London's Ring Of Steel

According to London’s Observer newpaper, the plan stems from the fear that the area around Big Ben and Parliament are vulnerable to attacks from truck bombs. Since a rash of IRA bombings 10 years ago led to street closures, and congestion led to a charge on private vehicles, London’s City business district has been significantly reduced.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Tyco Steps Into Future Power

"We are excited to be working with Plug Power, a leading-edge provider of new technologies targeted at the telecommunications industry," said Terrence Cummings, vice president and general manager, Tyco Electronic Installation Services. "This relationship will enhance the growth opportunities available to us in providing installation, engineering and maintenance services to the backup power market." Tyco Electronics Installation Services has a nationwide footprint covered by more than 300 qualified technicians who will be available to install and service the GenCore product line. Plug Power has already trained a number of Tyco technicians to operate, install and maintain Plug Power GenCore systems. Tyco is incorporating GenCore-specific training into the basic curriculum available to its service force.

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Sat
14
Aug
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Billions Needed

According to the PTA, more than 16 times as many people use public transport like buses, ferries and trains, compared with domestic air travel. PTA president William Millar says that transit organisations have spent around $US1.7 billion on raising security levels but government funding for more surveillance cameras at stations, improved comms paths and better training are required to get the job done. Meanwhile, the Transportation Security Administration will start screening train passengers using X-ray machines, sniffer dogs and explosive detection equipment at Washington Station this month. The idea is hat screeners will run baggage through an X-ray machine while passengers will go through an explosives detection portal. It’s not the first time airport-style security has been implemented at a railway station. In May a suburban station in Maryland was one of the most secure in the world as a pilot for the Washington Station roll-out went through its paces.

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