The AIREF-sanctioned study was conducted by criminal justice professors from Eastern Kentucky University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Western Illinois University. 
This new project is based on surveys of more than 400 incarcerated burglars who violated both domestic and commercial properties. 
The objective of the study was to answer the following five questions:
1. What motivates burglars to engage in burglary?
2. What factors are considered during target selection?
3. What deters burglars from specific targets?
4. What techniques do burglars use during the commission of their crimes?
5. Are there gender differences in burglary motivation, target selection, and techniques?
The initial report includes several positive and compelling findings. For example, when asked about alarms: 60 per cent said an alarm would cause them to seek an alternative target. 
Meanwhile 83 per cent would try to determine if an alarm was present before attempting a burglary; and if a burglary was initiated and an alarm was found, half would discontinue the attempt. 
The study found alarms and surveillance cameras topped most other types of deterrents, including dogs and steel bars.