METRO Trains Melbourne has shortlisted candidates for the supply of a software-based video analytics solution for use with Metro's existing 6000-camera CCTV security monitoring system. 

In a tender that closed late May, MTM sought responses from prospective suppliers who could demonstrate that their solution’s functionality met Metro requirements and was compatible with existing conventional CCTV surveillance cameras (both analogue and digital) and further, that they were experienced in implementing and deploying such systems in environments similar to MTM, for instance, in areas of mass public gathering such as within a busy transport or retail environment. 

Shortlisted suppliers will be invited to participate in further due diligence activities enabling them to submit a definite response for the supply of a solution and associated services to MTM. Metro Trains Melbourne operates a fleet of 407 three-car train sets on 837 kilometres of track in Melbourne. There are 16 regular service train lines and one special events train line. The train fleet travels more than 30 million kilometres and provides more than 228 million customer boardings each year, more than 14,000 services each week and carries over 415,000 passengers each weekday. Metro Trains Melbourne is also responsible for 215 railway stations and employs a workforce of 3,500. 


Southern Cross station has 180 cameras.

CCTV is used in and around Melbourne’s metropolitan and regional train stations for a number of purposes, including monitoring train movements, passenger safety, and deterring and investigating crime. Camera numbers vary across the network with bigger stations like Flinders Street Station having approximately 150 cameras and Southern Cross Station having 180, all operating 24 hours a day. Most cameras show only a fixed view and only a few have zoom, pan and tilt functions – fixed cameras are ideal for IVA.

At larger stations, CCTV footage is monitored from an onsite control room, while on suburban lines footage from several stations is monitored from a central suburban station. Control room operators and Department of Transport personnel can view footage live, but do not have access to recorded footage, while recorded footage from cameras at train stations and inside trains is accessible only to management centre staff.♦