THE National Museum of Australia is planning a major upgrade and integration of its electronic security solutions after the recent upgrade of its CCTV solution to full IP. 

NMA will replace or upgrade its existing Honeywell EBI access control system, Commend intercom system, etc, with a new EACS, intercom system, new ACPs, new card readers, new access smart cards, new/existing electric strikes, new/existing electromagnetic locks, etc, with an associated HLI of security systems.

The work will include cabling all new equipment, existing equipment (as required), integrating equipment and the NMA supplied headend. The contractor will remove redundant equipment and cabling. They will also integrate the EACS and intercom system with other NMA security, IT and BMS equipment. 

The work will include reconfiguration of the display console and monitor layout in the security control room for the EACS workstations and management of the cutover from the existing access control and intercom systems to the new EACS. 

As part of the process, access control systems at NMA’s Acton and Vicars Street Mitchell premises shall also be completely upgraded. The existing access control Systems at McEacharn Place and Gladstone Street will be incorporated into the maintenance responsibilities/program of the EACS Upgrade.

The National Museum of Australia preserves and interprets Australia's social history, exploring the key issues, people and events that have shaped the nation. The building has 6600 square metres of exhibition space and is composed of several individual spaces pieced together like a jigsaw puzzle, forming a semicircle around the Garden of Australian Dreams.

Designed by architect Howard Raggatt (design architect and design director for the project), the museum building is based on a theme of knotted ropes, symbolically bringing together the stories of Australians. The shape of the main entrance hall continues this theme and the entirely non-symmetrical complex is designed to not look like a museum, with startling colours and angles, unusual spaces and unpredictable projections and textures.

In December 1996 the building of the Museum was announced as the key Centenary of Federation project, and Acton Peninsula was chosen as the site, with funding confirmed in 1997. The National Museum of Australia opened on 11 March 2001. It is home to the National Historical Collection and is one of the nation’s major cultural institutions.

Closing date for the tender is June 23, 2017. ♦