Scott Myles sets up the test jig at MQU

MACQUARIE University undertook an onsite dome camera motion blur test on January 18 as part of an ongoing CCTV upgrade which will see the university’s 900-camera CCTV solution migrated to an external cloud provider.

The motion blur test was undertaken by MQU’s CCTV consultant Scott Myles and included parameters such as motion blur, bit rate, sharpness, depth of field, WDR, noise and colour rendition in low light and very low light applications, as well as ease of integrating with MQU’s Milestone XProtect Corporate VMS.

SEN’s Rotakin unit was seconded to assist the process of establishing units of blur and the results of the test, which will be published in SEN’s February issue, showed 3 standouts, though each camera approached the challenges of the application in different ways, creating application-specific trade-offs.

“The test was conducted in the sort of conditions a camera will typically face in a university environment and it was pleasing to find 3 cameras that met the criteria, though to varying levels against each parameter,” Myles said. “It was also pleasing to get input from one of MQU’s experienced security operators, whose instincts corroborated the data we had gathered.”

Macquarie University’s video surveillance solution, which is integrated with Gallagher Command Centre and Jacques Intercoms among other sub-systems, is an application that forward-thinking security managers and integrators must pay close attention to over the next 12 months.

MQU’s cloud-based storage of more than 900 (soon to be 1000) high resolution CCTV cameras will be at the cutting edge of video surveillance and cloud networking technology. Following a successful proof of concept recently, during which 900 cameras were simulated to a remote data centre, planning is well underway for a complete cloud transition within 12 months.