Analysis

Clearfix
Thu
15
Dec
JohnA's picture

Electronic Security Technology in 2016: The Year That Was

2016 was a pivotal year in electronic security technology
2016 was a pivotal year in electronic security technology

LOOKING back on 2016 it’s hard not to see groundswells across the electronic security industry that don’t just point to future trends but underscore the nature of our technology.

The impact of Mirai malware, which turns CCTV recorders and cameras into attack bots, rolls on. Mirai shows us many things – that the electronic security industry is a networked animal and that online ecosystems are unsafe. For the longest time, integrators and end users have managed to avoid being targeted by high profile attacks – mostly through the judicious use of subnets and VLANs – but network defence is going to be a serious consideration in our future.  

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Thu
15
Dec
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Scentre Group CCTV Camera Shootout: Full Report

Entry camera test array at Westfield, Bondi Junction
Entry camera test array at Westfield, Bondi Junction

Last month Scentre Group’s National CCTV Camera Shootout was held at Westfield in Bondi Junction. This is the largest CCTV camera shootout of its type in Australia, with the diverse mall environment giving attendees plenty to think about across 4 camera groups. 

WE often rattle on about objective camera testing in SEN and we do this because there is absolutely nothing that highlights strengths and weaknesses of performance more clearly than lining up a group of cameras in generally identical circumstances and seeing which image looks best. The challenge is getting all the latest cameras in one place – even more difficult, providing a series of real world applications that allow adequate conditions for comparison. 

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Sat
19
Nov
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Electronic Security Cyber Vulnerabilities a Failure of Will

Physical security industry carries potential viral load
Physical security industry carries potential viral load

LAST month a vast distributed denial of service attack was launched by a group that marshalled 500,000 network-connected devices, including IP cameras and DVRs, using Mirai malware. The first stage of the attack was the creation of an army of botnets which subsequently flooded popular websites, including twitter, with DDoS traffic and volumes that crashed servers.

Particular products with basic default passwords have been called out for their involvement but there’s a much larger issue here – it’s the clear vulnerability of all network-connected devices to attack. Running parallel with this trend is a tidal trend to drive security solutions of all types of security systems using mobile devices – a trend that’s driven by changes in the way we all consume information and interact with layers of system functionality. 

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Wed
21
Sep
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Alarm Monitoring: The Revolution will be Televised

Satellite TV and home automation
Satellite TV and home automation

Echostar, a satellite TV and internet provider based in the U.S. with global operations and annual earnings of $US3.1 billion, has turned its attention to the security market and plans to provide automation, intrusion detection, video verification and video monitoring, as well as self-monitoring. Can its plan work? Maybe… 

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Fri
09
Sep
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Operational Requirements Are The Ultimate Technical Benchmark

The smartest technology is that most fit for purpose...
The smartest technology is that most fit for purpose...

SOMETHING SEN talks about with monotonous regularity is ‘operational requirements’ yet we consistently see products and applications which leave us wondering whether or not these imperatives got lost somewhere during the process of design and installation.

It’s easy to see how this might happen when considering the complexity of many solutions and the variable performance parameters of much of the technology currently available. There’s also the cognitive bias inevitably introduced by products a company sells or installs. That pointed saying that when you’re holding a hammer every problem looks like a nail applies to electronic security solutions, as well. 

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Mon
15
Aug
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Special Report: New Products From Security 2016 Expo

Bosch B Series alarm panel
Bosch B Series alarm panel

Security 2016 Exhibition in Melbourne gave us a chance to take a look at the latest product releases, get a sense of trends, as well checking out some of the vapourware teasers that manufacturers and distributors roll out at big events.

SECURITY 2016 had a nice feel – it’s a good venue and the square layout at the MCEC somehow mitigates the sense of being tucked away in far corners. The organisers quoted visitor numbers of around 4500, which seemed slightly optimistic from behind Sony's New York Loft Bar. Regardless, it was another good show considering this was a third year in Melbourne thanks to the ongoing revamp of the Exhibition and Convention Centre in Darling Harbour. While some exhibitors were jumping to conclusions on the first day, by the end of the show on Friday afternoon, most were happy with the turnout and quality of the visitors they'd seen. 

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Mon
08
Aug
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Access Control Strongest Growth Trend at Security 2016

Gallagher Mobile App
Gallagher Mobile App

DAYS after a major exhibition like Security 2016 in Melbourne last month you’re still getting your mind around the things you saw, deciding which solutions stood out, which presaged developments of the future and which trends were strongest.

Discounting the overarching shift towards ever more integration, the strongest growth trend at Security 2016 was access control. It’s not surprising this should be so. Current global risk profiles demand that organisations control access to their spaces – there’s no doubt this is a driving force behind the trend. There’s also the relentless and endless pursuit of lower costs which push users to seek greater efficiencies, including remote management of onsite functionalities. 

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Fri
15
Jul
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Security 2016: Innovation Is The Engine of Growth

Innovation is the engine of growth
Innovation is the engine of growth

ELECTRONIC security sales are set to grow at $US110 billion through 2020 at the powerful rate of 11.3 per cent. The reason for the growth is 3-fold – bigger budgets, increasing global threat levels and good old product innovation. 

As we head to Security 2016 Expo in Melbourne, suppliers, installers, consultants and end users need to bear in mind that the last thing on the list is the key to profitability and operational success. Electronic security technology has reached a point of layered ‘awareness’ that allows security managers to pry considerably more capability from inputs and outputs than ever before. There are new and clever ways of making the information from hundreds of millions of inputs and outputs actionable and accessible.

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Fri
24
Jun
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Integrators, End Users Wide Open to Access Control

Access control - first, second and third line of defence
Access control - first, second and third line of defence

SOMETHING interesting came out of SecTech Roadshow. In every city, integrators and end users loudly expressed their desire to see more in the way of access control and intrusion detection solutions – more controllers, readers, panels, sensors, and reporting and management solutions. 

More evidence of the hunger came from suppliers – companies like BGWT with S2, Inner Range with Inception and Bosch with the G Panel and the 2000/3000 alarm system said they did extremely well at the show – as did Tyco with NEO, CSD with SecureNet-enabled SkyGuard, QSS with BPT intercoms and LSC with ICT controllers. 

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Fri
17
Jun
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Automation or Information? Homing in on Google

Google - Automation or information?
Google - Automation or information?

With the release of the new Google Home virtual agent recently (after Google’s publication of smart home patents and $US3.2 Billion purchase of Nest Labs and Dropcam), you can’t but wonder about the company’s grand strategy for domestic solutions. Does Google want home automation or home information? 

WHY do Google’s plans for home automation systems matter? It’s the company’s seamless underlying penetration of key layers of networked infrastructure and services that are of interest to electronic security people. When you provide so many of the highways down which potential customers drive their network operations and online explorations, it makes perfect sense to increase the depth of services you provide. But is home automation really a way Google can make money, or is there something else behind the play?

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