Analysis

Clearfix
Thu
19
Feb
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Network video standards: ONVIF vs PSIA vs OPSIS

Of course, general comms standards like Weigand in the access control industry, have not led to open architecture across multiple access management software and hardware platforms and there’s not much chance the video surveillance market would go all the way down that path – is there?

Regardless of the difficulties, standards are on the horizon and they need to be seen in the context of the interests of the groups pushing them. In some cases the interests are commercial and while this is all perfectly legitimate, it’s not surprising there are subtle differences in ultimate goals – though they are very subtle.

Of course, there’s a bunch of talk in the market about competing interests as well as a growing fear of a network video standards war akin to the annoying VHS vs Beta video player wars of the early 1980s. So, which horse should you back or can you sit back and ignore the whole business?

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Wed
18
Feb
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Driving a hybrid

Now we’ve reached the mid-pint of 2008 it’s becoming clear that the electronic security industry is going to be a hybrid for some time. As a result our techs are going to need to be able to handle analog electronics and IT environments equally well. There’s no question the electronic security industry has always been, at its extremes, among the most demanding of industries from a technical perspective. Quality techs working for major integrators have long had to grapple with everything from internal to external sensing, cameras and optics, custom hardware, cabling, power supply and illumination.

If that’s not enough, our industry sprawls into local and remote comms – wireless and wired – as well as pressing up against building management and fire control. An electronic security integrator of quality is as likely to be installing a powered gate as a biometric access control device, an external infrared illuminator as a major residential intercom system.

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Wed
18
Feb
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Central Security Distribution

Q: Can you tell us exactly who is behind Central Security Distribution?

A: The people behind CSD are Vin Lopes, Doug Fraser and Mark Cunnington

Q: It could be argued the local electronic security distribution market is tight. What does Central Security Distribution bring to integrators and installers they won’t get elsewhere?

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Mon
16
Jun
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Clouds on the horizon

JASON Calacanis, the founder of the people-powered search engine Mahalo recently claimed a new online storage service is coming from Google. What’s more, according to Calacanis, the service will be free. It’s a development that could have ramifications for CCTV people further down the track.

"Tried to get google rep to give launch date for Google Backup service," Mr Calacanis said in his online update late last month. "He got mad flustered ... u can be sure Google Backup is coming."

And Calacanis underscored his speculation at the recent CEBIT show in Sydney.

"From what I know it's coming out," Calacanis told the press. "I know people, and I've heard that it's being worked on."

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Sun
15
Jun
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Mega security exhibition

AT every security show for the past 5 years we’ve been asking ourselves the same question. When will digital and networked video products overcome their analog forbears and dominate the earth? The question was on everybody’s lips at ISC West in Las Vegas last month and while a clear answer may not have been forthcoming at least the future is taking coherent shape.

Probably the biggest thing to come out of ISC was the growing presence of megapixel cameras and by that I don’t mean cameras with 5 or 10 megapixel sensors and the optical resolution of a wedgetail eagle. These new cameras have modest counts of around 1.5-2.0 megapixels and use smart new compression sets to deliver HD resolution at modest bandwidth.

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Tue
08
Apr
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3-D CCTV

Current video surveillance technology produces a 2-dimensional image, while a camera with a pair of lenses is able to deliver 3-D images. Although 3-D offers more detail and better depth of field new research into camera lenses could provide something that’s immeasurably better still.

A Stanford electronics research team is working on an image sensor that not only has more pixels, it also incorporates multiple lenses into the sensor substrate itself creating a sensor comprising multiple sensors. The result of all this is a 3 megapixel image sensor made up of 12,616 individual on-chip cameras, each camera combining 256 0.7 micron pixels topped by a lens. Importantly, the technology can do away with current lens technology and that means cameras will offer more picture for less money.

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Wed
26
Sep
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Connective Tissue

Given networking’s current level of sophistication it’s hard to imagine just where things are going to go but if consider the fact effective networking only kicked off 5 years ago, and you start to get some sense of perspective. Fact is, we are at the threshold of something very unusual – a form of networked society that’s going to become so connected it will be possessed of what socially-minded boffins are calling a ‘hive mind’. Imagine billions of people and millions of businesses all linked by superfast, frictionless networks –able to reach each another anywhere, securely, remotely. Imagine networks that are supported by smart network devices that create comms paths which are collaborative, intuitive and self-healing – comms paths with a sense of themselves and with a sense of you. What would such a vast and seamless substrate mean for electronic security systems? For a start it would make them pervasive.

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Mon
03
Sep
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MPLS: The Dominos Are Falling

The game of technology-tag has been an interesting one. Analogue cameras have lasted far longer than many industry pundits predicted. It’s not as if digital cameras haven’t been around a very long time – patent records show they were invented by Australia’s own Zone Technology back in the 1980s. But the momentum of research and development in the first half of the noughties gave analog cameras a second lease on life thanks to major advances that include but aren’t limited to the Pixim chip, as well as successive generations of superb cameras from leading manufacturers. The delay hasn’t just been about IP camera performance. Taking the market segment as a whole it’s quite clear that much of the problem from an integration perspective lies with the networks themselves. It’s not just bandwidth.

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Mon
30
Jul
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Woeful Broadband Slays Wan-Based CCTV Networks

Just to put this into perspective, Australian business pays about 60 per cent more than U.S. companies do for broadband services but gets 10 times less performance. Big local carrier Telstra might drone on about the tyranny of distance but given most business is located in geographically constrained metropolitan areas this is a very tired argument. The tyranny of distance was part of Comms Minister Helen Coonan’s spin when she congratulated Australia on its “performance” recently. "This is an outstanding achievement considering the particular challenges of providing telecommunications access at fair prices over a vast continent with a small population," Senator Coonan blethered. But Coonan failed to point out that over most of inland Australia – from Mount Victoria west of Sydney and for some 5000km across to the coast of WA – you get 56kb dial-up modem access only.

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Sat
07
Jul
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Full Digital: Change Is Coming

What’s obvious from many recent installations – including some of the largest ones – is that end users are now prepared to pay a premium for storage capability that allows them to take advantage of the higher resolution possible over networks when quality full digital cameras are used. Such cameras have no analogue to digital conversion process and the images they provide can have many times the resolution of some analogue cameras. The demand for better resolution and the associated increase in file sizes means that as the industry moves forward, bigger storage capacity, higher camera resolutions and improvements in compression are going to become the central planks of future system capability.As every surveillance person well knows, none of this is entirely straightforward. Depending on the nature of the solution required there will be issues surrounding network bandwidth, the size of stored files and maintenance of image rates at peak times.

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